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34.4: Exercise 34


34.4: Exercise 34

34.4: Exercise 34

New International Version
I sought the LORD, and he answered me he delivered me from all my fears.

New Living Translation
I prayed to the LORD, and he answered me. He freed me from all my fears.

English Standard Version
I sought the LORD, and he answered me and delivered me from all my fears.

Berean Study Bible
I sought the LORD, and He answered me He delivered me from all my fears.

King James Bible
I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.

New King James Version
I sought the LORD, and He heard me, And delivered me from all my fears.

New American Standard Bible
I sought the LORD and He answered me, And rescued me from all my fears.

NASB 1995
I sought the LORD, and He answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

NASB 1977
I sought the LORD, and He answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

Amplified Bible
I sought the LORD [on the authority of His word], and He answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

Christian Standard Bible
I sought the LORD, and he answered me and rescued me from all my fears.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
I sought the LORD, and He answered me and delivered me from all my fears.

American Standard Version
I sought Jehovah, and he answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
I have begged of LORD JEHOVAH and he answered me and saved me from all my troubles.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
I sought the Lord diligently, and he hearkened to me, and delivered me from all my sojournings.

Contemporary English Version
I asked the LORD for help, and he saved me from all my fears.

Douay-Rheims Bible
I sought the Lord, and he heard me and he delivered me from all my troubles.

English Revised Version
I sought the LORD, and he answered me, and delivered me from all my fears.

Good News Translation
I prayed to the LORD, and he answered me he freed me from all my fears.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
I went to the LORD for help. He answered me and rescued me from all my fears.

International Standard Version
I sought the LORD and he answered me he delivered me from all of my fears.

JPS Tanakh 1917
I sought the LORD, and He answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

Literal Standard Version
I sought YHWH, and He answered me, And delivered me from all my fears.

NET Bible
I sought the LORD's help and he answered me he delivered me from all my fears.

New Heart English Bible
I sought the LORD, and he answered me, and delivered me from all my fears.

World English Bible
I sought Yahweh, and he answered me, and delivered me from all my fears.

Young's Literal Translation
I sought Jehovah, and He answered me, And from all my fears did deliver me.

Matthew 7:7
Ask, and it will be given to you seek, and you will find knock, and the door will be opened to you.

2 Chronicles 15:2
So he went out to meet Asa and said to him, "Listen to me, Asa and all Judah and Benjamin. The LORD is with you when you are with Him. If you seek Him, He will be found by you, but if you forsake Him, He will forsake you.

Psalm 3:4
To the LORD I cry aloud, and He answers me from His holy mountain. Selah

Psalm 9:10
Those who know Your name trust in You, for You, O LORD, have not forsaken those who seek You.

Psalm 22:21
Save me from the mouth of the lion at the horns of the wild oxen You have answered me!

Psalm 27:8
My heart said, "Seek His face." Your face, O LORD, I will seek.

Psalm 34:6
This poor man called out, and the LORD heard him He saved him from all his troubles.

I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.

Psalm 18:6 In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple, and my cry came before him, even into his ears.

Psalm 22:24 For he hath not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted neither hath he hid his face from him but when he cried unto him, he heard.

Psalm 31:22 For I said in my haste, I am cut off from before thine eyes: nevertheless thou heardest the voice of my supplications when I cried unto thee.

Psalm 27:1,2 A Psalm of David. The LORD is my light and my salvation whom shall I fear? the LORD is the strength of my life of whom shall I be afraid? …

Psalm 46:2 Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea


METHODS: SEARCH STRATEGY, SELECTION CRITERIA AND STRATIFICATION

Publications examining pulmonary arterial pressure values during both rest and physical exercise in healthy volunteers were identified by a Medline search using the keywords “pulmonary arterial pressure and exercise”, “right heart catheterisation and exercise” and “right heart catheter and exercise”. The search was restricted to papers available in the English, German or French languages. A secondary search reviewed the reference lists of relevant papers (mostly not available in Medline). This secondary hand search identified the majority of included studies. Two reviewers (G. Kovacs and H. Olschewski) independently screened the studies identified by the two searches. Differences over inclusion of studies were resolved by consensus reached after discussion.

All publications working up original data based on right heart catheterisation were included. Studies were excluded when they were referring to and interpreting previous examinations, or when the original data were not clearly identifiable, as well as when they did not provide detailed descriptions of the applied methods or complete haemodynamic data, or when drug-induced changes of pulmonary pressure were investigated. From studies examining pulmonary haemodynamics at high altitude or under hypoxic conditions, only the control measurements performed at sea level and under normal oxygen tension were considered. All subjects in all studies were described as entirely free of clinical symptoms, or had minor medical conditions that, according to the authors, had no influence on pulmonary haemodynamics.

The Medline search identified a total of 1,932 studies. According to the selection criteria, 138 studies were retrieved for more detailed evaluation and 16 studies were ultimately found to be eligible for inclusion. The reasons for exclusion were as follows: not only healthy subjects (38 studies) no original data (10 studies) no right heart catheterisation or no pulmonary arterial pressure measurements (72 studies) case report (two studies). After the secondary hand search, 31 further studies were found to be eligible and were included in the final analysis. Altogether data from 47 studies published in the English, German and French literature between 1947 and 2003 were reviewed, which included 72 separate study populations 9–58.

The majority of studies used cycle ergometry, but some studies used treadmill exercise, leg or arm presses in the supine or upright position. The investigations were performed in different populations (younger or older, untrained or trained, female or male preponderance) in different countries. Data were stratified upon predefined criteria including sex, age (<30 yrs, 30–50 yrs, ≥50 yrs), origin (USA, Europe), body position (supine, upright) and exercise level. Three exercise levels were distinguished (slight, submaximal and maximal exercise), and the data were assigned to these categories, according to the following hierarchical criteria: 1) the original assessment by the authors 2) heart rate (slight: 100–110 min −1 , submaximal: 130–135 min −1 , maximal: 160–170 min −1 ) 3) work-rate (slight: ∼50 W, submaximal: ∼100 W, maximal: ∼150–200 W) 4) peak oxygen uptake (slight: ∼1,000 mL·min −1 , submaximal: ∼1,400–1,600 mL·min −1 , maximal: ∼2,100–2,400 mL·min −1 ) and 5) cardiac output (slight: ∼12–14 L·min −1 , submaximal: ∼16 L·min −1 , maximal: ∼19–20 L·min −1 ). Owing to variations between study protocols, not all subjects were examined at all stages of exercise. Time points 2–3 min after start of a certain workload were considered for this analysis.

In some protocols, light sedation was applied before right heart catheterisation. These studies were included, as a previous review of a large database showed that such pre-medication may decrease systemic arterial pressure values, but has no significant impact on pulmonary haemodynamics 5.

Studies performed in the supine position were evaluated separately from studies in the upright position (sitting/exercising on the cycle ergometer, standing/walking on the treadmill). Few investigations involved the same subjects in the supine and upright positions. The comparison of haemodynamics depending on posture in these studies was analysed separately.

The association between sex and pa was examined in studies in which both females and males were included and the results given according to sex.

Data originating from Europe, the USA and other parts of the world were compared to exclude bias due to geographical location.

In most studies, the zero level was set at 10 cm above the table (or 5 cm below the level of the sternum). For a few subjects (∼10% of all subjects) a slightly different levelling was used (e.g. the mid-axillary line).

The recorded data were not reported uniformly in the original publications. Some authors gave the mean values and the standard deviation of parameters for the whole group (∼70% of all subjects), with or without describing individual results in other studies, only individual data were presented (∼30% of all subjects). In these cases, the present authors calculated the mean values and standard deviations. The number of study populations (e.g. males and females, different age groups, when independently evaluated) and subjects examined for each particular variable at the given exercise level are indicated.

For the final analysis, the weighted mean and the weighted standard deviation values for the whole population reviewed were calculated. To evaluate the effect of position, sex and age at rest and during exercise, subgroup analysis was performed using only those studies in which the results were given according to these variables. A random effects model was used for the meta-analysis (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). To further describe the impact of age on pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise, a meta-regression analysis was performed comparing the haemodynamic data for all subjects aged <50 yrs with those aged ≥50 yrs. To explore the robustness of the results, pre-planned sensitivity analysis of geographical location and exercise method was performed. Upper limits of normal (ULN) were calculated as mean+2 sd .


34.4: Exercise 34

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/*
(Format an integer) Write a method with the following header to format the integer
with the specified width.
public static String format(int number, int width)
The method returns a string for the number with one or more prefix 0s. The size
of the string is the width. For example, format(34, 4) returns 0034 and format(
34, 5) returns 00034. If the number is longer than the width, the method
returns the string representation for the number. For example, format(34, 1)
returns 34.
Write a test program that prompts the user to enter a number and its width and
displays a string returned by invoking format(number, width).
*/
import java.util.Scanner
public class Exercise_06_37 <
/* * Main Method */
public static void main ( String [] args ) <
Scanner input = new Scanner ( System . in) // Create a Scanner
// Prompt the user to enter a number and its width
System . out . print( " Enter a number and its width: " )
int number = input . nextInt()
int width = input . nextInt()
// Display a string of formatted number
System . out . println(
number + " formatted to width " + width + " : " + format(number, width))
>
/* * Method format returns a string for the number with one or more prefix 0s */
public static String format ( int number , int width ) <
String num = number + " " // String representation for the number
// If the number is shorter than the width format
// Else return the string representation for the number
if (num . length() < width) <
for ( int i = width - num . length() i > 0 i -- ) <
num = 0 + num
>
>
return num
>
>

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Here are the six basic principles that made it happen

1. One-Set-To-Failure

Follow Arthur Jones' general recommendations for one-set-to-failure (80-120 seconds per set) from the little-known Colorado Experiment, but with lower frequency (maximum of twice per week) and with at least 3 minutes between exercises.

2. 5/5 Cadence

Perform every repetition with a 5/5 cadence (5 seconds up, 5 seconds down) to eliminate momentum and ensure constant load.

3. Focus On 4-8 Exercises

Focus on no more than 4-8 exercises total (including at least one multi-joint exercise for pressing, pulling and leg movements: leg press, trap-bar or conventional deadlift, overhead press, Yates bent row, dips, incline dumbbell bench press, etc.) and exercise your entire body each workout to elicit a maximal hormonal (testosterone, growth hormone + IGF-1) response.

Here is one of the more effective sequences I've found ("+" = superset):

  • Pullover + Bent row
  • Shoulder-width leg press
  • Pec-deck + weighted dips
  • Leg curl
  • Reverse thick-bar curl (purchase cut 2" piping from Home Depot if needed)
  • Seated calf raises
  • Manual neck resistance
  • Machine crunches

4. Protein & Low Glycemic Carbs

Eat enormous quantities of protein (much like my current fat-loss diet) with low-glycemic index carbohydrates like quinoa, but drop calories by 50% one day per week to prevent protein uptake down-regulation.

5. Increase Recovery Time Along With Size

Exercise less frequently as you increase strength and size, as your recovery abilities can only increase 20-30%, while you can often increase fat-free muscle tissue up to 100% before reaching a genetic set-point.

6. Record Everything

Record every workout in detail, including date, time of day, order of exercises, reps, and weight. Remember that this is an experiment, and you need to control the variables to accurately assess progress and make adjustments.

For the ladies not interested in becoming the Hulk, if you follow a "slow-carb" diet and reduce rest periods to 30 seconds between exercises, this exact workout protocol can help you lose 10-20 pounds of fat in the same 28-day time span.

Questioning the basic assumptions about resistance training led me to a surprising conclusion: less is more. It just requires working out smarter instead of more often.


Trajectories of change in self-esteem in older adults: exercise intervention effects

This 12-month, 2 arm, single blind randomized controlled exercise trial examined relationships among changes in multidimensional self-esteem as a function of intervention mode (i.e., walking vs. flexibility-toning-balance). Data were collected on three equidistant occasions (baseline, 6 and 12 months). One-hundred seventy-nine older adults (M(age) = 66.38) began the study and 145 completed assessments at all time points. Participants completed measures of physical and global self-esteem as well as demographic information. There were no significant group differences at baseline on these demographic indicators or esteem variables. Data were analyzed using linear and parallel process growth modeling procedures. Results supported the position that across both groups, domain-level (i.e., physical self-worth) was dependent upon sub-domain-level (i.e., perceived attractiveness, strength, and condition) esteem change. Furthermore, greater improvements were observed in the flexibility-toning-balance group, in terms of perceived strength and attractiveness esteem, compared to the walking group. Our findings support theoretically-based predictions and extend the literature showing unique psychological responses conditional on specific types of physical activities.

Figures

The theoretical structure of self-esteem

The theoretical structure of self-esteem

Mean plots of esteem variables…

Mean plots of esteem variables for walking and FTB groups across time. Walk…

Mean plots of parallel processes…

Mean plots of parallel processes for walking and FTB groups across time. Walk…


When you take the CliftonStrengths assessment, you uncover your unique combination of 34 CliftonStrengths themes.

The themes, which sort into four domains Learn more about the Four Domains of CliftonStrengths , are a culmination of decades of research led by Don Clifton to study and categorize the talents of the world's most successful people.

Together, the themes explain a simple but profound element of human behavior: what's right with people.

Individually, each theme gives you a way to describe what you naturally do best or what you might need help from others to accomplish.

Use the following resources to learn more about each of the 34 CliftonStrengths themes:


How it Works

If you're purchasing CliftonStrengths 34 for yourself:

  1. Add the product to your cart. When you are done shopping, proceed to checkout.
  2. Sign in to your account, or create an account if you don't already have one.
  3. After you complete the checkout process, you will receive instructions on how to take the assessment and manage your results, reports and resources on your Gallup Access account.
  4. Start using your personalized CliftonStrengths reports and other resources to maximize your potential.

If you're purchasing CliftonStrengths 34 for others:

  1. Add the number of access codes you want to purchase to your cart. When you are done shopping, proceed to checkout.
  2. Sign in to your account, or create an account if you don't already have one.
  3. After you complete the checkout process, you will receive instructions on how to manage and distribute your access codes using your Gallup Access account.

Children Act 1989

Children Act 1989, Section 34 is up to date with all changes known to be in force on or before 06 July 2021. There are changes that may be brought into force at a future date. Changes that have been made appear in the content and are referenced with annotations.

Changes to Legislation

Revised legislation carried on this site may not be fully up to date. Changes and effects are recorded by our editorial team in lists which can be found in the ‘Changes to Legislation’ area. Where those effects have yet to be applied to the text of the legislation by the editorial team they are also listed alongside the legislation in the affected provisions. Use the ‘more’ link to open the changes and effects relevant to the provision you are viewing.

Changes and effects yet to be applied to the whole Act associated Parts and Chapters:

Whole provisions yet to be inserted into this Act (including any effects on those provisions):

  • s. 4(1A)(aa) inserted by 2009 c. 24Sch. 6para. 21(3)
  • s. 4(1C) inserted by 2009 c. 24Sch. 6para. 21(4)
  • s. 4ZA(2)(aa) inserted by 2009 c. 24Sch. 6para. 22(3)
  • s. 4ZA(3A) inserted by 2009 c. 24Sch. 6para. 22(4)
  • s. 8(4)(k) inserted by 2021 c. 17s. 52(1)
  • s. 23E(1A)(ba) inserted by 2018 anaw 2Sch. 1para. 2(2)(b)
  • s. 31A(4A) inserted by 2014 c. 6s. 15(2)(b)
  • s. 36(11) inserted by 2018 anaw 2Sch. 1para. 2(3)
  • s. 91A inserted by 2021 c. 17s. 67(3)

34 Parental contact etc. with children in care. E+W

(1) Where a child is in the care of a local authority, the authority shall (subject to the provisions of this section) [ F1 and their duty under section 22(3)(a) ] [ F2 or, where the local authority is in Wales, under section 78(1)(a) of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 ] allow the child reasonable contact with—

(b) any guardian [ F3 or special guardian ] of his

[ F4 (ba) any person who by virtue of section 4A has parental responsibility for him ]

(c) where there was a [ F5 child arrangements ] order in force with respect to the child immediately before the care order was made, [ F6 any person named in the child arrangements order as a person with whom the child was to live ] and

(d) where, immediately before the care order was made, a person had care of the child by virtue of an order made in the exercise of the High Court’s inherent jurisdiction with respect to children, that person.

(2) On an application made by the authority or the child, the court may make such order as it considers appropriate with respect to the contact which is to be allowed between the child and any named person.

(3) On an application made by—

(a) any person mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (1) or

(b) any person who has obtained the leave of the court to make the application,

the court may make such order as it considers appropriate with respect to the contact which is to be allowed between the child and that person.

(4) On an application made by the authority or the child, the court may make an order authorising the authority to refuse to allow contact between the child and any person who is mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (1) and named in the order.

(5) When making a care order with respect to a child, or in any family proceedings in connection with a child who is in the care of a local authority, the court may make an order under this section, even though no application for such an order has been made with respect to the child, if it considers that the order should be made.

(6) An authority may refuse to allow the contact that would otherwise be required by virtue of subsection (1) or an order under this section if—

(a) they are satisfied that it is necessary to do so in order to safeguard or promote the child’s welfare and

(i) is decided upon as a matter of urgency and

(ii) does not last for more than seven days.

[ F7 (6A) Where (by virtue of an order under this section, or because subsection (6) applies) a local authority in England are authorised to refuse to allow contact between the child and a person mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (c) of paragraph 15(1) of Schedule 2, paragraph 15(1) of that Schedule does not require the authority to endeavour to promote contact between the child and that person. ]

[ F8 (6B) Where (by virtue of an order under this section, or because subsection (6) applies) a local authority in Wales is authorised to refuse contact between the child and a person mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (c) of section 95(1) of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, section 95(1) of that Act does not require the authority to promote contact between the child and that person. ]

(7) An order under this section may impose such conditions as the court considers appropriate.

(8) The Secretary of State may by regulations make provision as to—

[ F9 (za) what a local authority in England must have regard to in considering whether contact between a child and a person mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (1) is consistent with safeguarding and promoting the child's welfare ]

(a) the steps to be taken by a local authority who have exercised their powers under subsection (6)

(b) the circumstances in which, and conditions subject to which, the terms of any order under this section may be departed from by agreement between the local authority and the person in relation to whom the order is made

(c) notification by a local authority of any variation or suspension of arrangements made (otherwise than under an order under this section) with a view to affording any person contact with a child to whom this section applies.

(9) The court may vary or discharge any order made under this section on the application of the authority, the child concerned or the person named in the order.

(10) An order under this section may be made either at the same time as the care order itself or later.

(11) Before [ F10 making, varying or discharging an order under this section or ] making a care order with respect to any child the court shall—

(a) consider the arrangements which the authority have made, or propose to make, for affording any person contact with a child to whom this section applies and

(b) invite the parties to the proceedings to comment on those arrangements.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We would like to thank Silvia Fontana, Upper GI Cancer nurse specialist from the Hospital del Mar, for coordinating patient’s management, Marta Climent for expert help in the evaluation of HRQL, Joan Sancho for help with statistical analysis, Montse Villatoro and Milo Muns for nutritional assessments, Laura Gutiérrez and Concepción Ballano for coordinating different aspects of the pulmonary function, and Marta Pulido for editing the manuscript and editorial assistance.


Watch the video: Steps to perform Pelvic Rocking Exercise - Dr. Shefali Wangoo (November 2021).