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Coastline College - Mathematics


Coastline College - Mathematics

In accordance with California Assembly Bill No. 705 (2017-18), placement testing for English and Math courses are no longer required. Degree-seeking students are encouraged to take English and Math in their first year. Coastline no longer administers placement tests.

ENGLISH REQUIREMENT FOR AA/AS DEGREE

Students graduating from Coastline College with an AA/AS Degree are required to demonstrate competency in English. Competency in English is demonstrated through completion of ENGL C100 or ENGL C135 or an equivalent course or higher. The prerequisite for ENGL C100-Freshman Composition and ENGL C135-Business Writing is no longer required therefore, students may now register for either course without submitting prior proof of prerequisite or placement.

MATH REQUIREMENT FOR AA/AS DEGREE

Competency in Math is demonstrated through any of the following:

  • eligible placement results into MATH C100 or higher
  • completion of MATH C030 or MATH C045* or equivalent course or higher with a grade of "C" or better
  • completion of two years of high school algebra with a grade of "C" or better

*Note: MATH C045-Combo Elem & Inter Algebra (6 credit/SH) is a new pilot course offering for Summer 2019. This course is a combination of Elementary and Intermediate Algebra. Students are encouraged not to take additional courses with MATH C045 because of the intensive coursework.

MATH PREREQUISITE

A Prerequisite is a requirement which must be met before enrollment in a course. All math courses have prerequisites.

BEFORE ENROLLING IN A MATH COURSE

It is recommended that students submit prerequisite documents prior to the end of their first semester of attendance and no later than four weeks prior to enrolling in a Math course. Documents submitted to Coastline College are subject to interpretation.

ENGLISH AND MATH PLACEMENT GUIDES

Students may receive placement into English and Math courses via the following alternative methods:

Multiple Measure Assessment Project (MMAP) - If you attended a United States accredited high school within the last 10 years, your placement into Math and English courses may be determined according to courses you completed while in high school—the grades received in those courses, and your cumulative (unweighted) GPA. Some students may be placed directly in transfer-level Math and English courses.

  • Unofficial transcripts can be submitted to [email protected] for a placement evaluation. Official transcripts will be required prior to graduation if high school coursework is used to meet Math Competency.
  • Official transcripts submitted after January 2, 2018 are automatically evaluated for placement. To request placement evaluation of a transcript submitted prior to January 2, 2018, please email [email protected]

Advanced Placement (AP) scores - A minimum score of "3" or above on AP Calculus, AP English Literature or AP English Language and Composition.

International Baccalaureate (IB) scores - A minimum score of "5" or above on Mathematics HL.

Students who have successfully* completed an English or Math course class at a regionally accredited institution may submit transcripts for evaluation. Coastline will determine if prior coursework is equivalent to a Coastline course, whether it satisfies course prerequisites and if the prior coursework meets the requirements for graduation. Unofficial transcripts can be submitted for placement, but official transcripts will be required at the time an Official Degree Plan is requested. If you are waiting for your Official Degree Plan to be completed and need placement now, please contact our office.

*Note - "W" notations and "C-" grades are not accepted for placement purposes.

College Placement Test - Students who have taken a placement test at another regionally accredited institution within the last two years should submit documentation of test results to our office. The documentation must include the course for which the student is eligible to register and will be subject to review by Coastline.

Non-traditional Credits (for Math placement only)- Students can submit results from any of the following test programs:

NOTE: This option does not satisfy the requirements for graduation. Students who self-place into a Math course are required to successfully complete MATH C030 or higher to meet the Coastline Math competency requirement for an AA/AS.

Students may bypass developmental-level prerequisites, without taking a placement examination, and place themselves into Math.

Students enrolling under this open placement model may wish to receive guidance to maximize their likelihood of succeeding in college-level (non-developmental) classes in the shortest time possible. Thus, we recommend students seek a counselor’s or advisor’s input if they have previously been placed into a lower-level Math or English course (using a Placement instrument, high school transcripts or other option outlined on our website), but wish to self-place into a high level course.

Students may petition to challenge a prerequisite. Please contact our office for further information. If you are challenging English because you have previously completed an English course, you must submit a course syllabus and be aware of minimum course requirements.

Coastline's College Readiness Program offers free online workshops for students wanting to refresh or build their Math (from basic mathematics to trigonometry) and English skills (includes reading and writing). The online workshops help you assess your current skills to ensure you are college ready! Based on your skill level, a personalized study path is created for you to review and build your skills. As you move through the workshops at your own pace and around your own schedule, your skills and confidence will increase. Access to the workshops is always open, so you can start anytime! For more information on how to register for an online workshop, please visit


Mathematics (MATH)

Review of elementary algebra, linear and quadratic equations, curve plotting, exponents, radicals, polynomials, systems of equations/inequalities, nonlinear equations, logarithmic and exponential functions, complex numbers, and applications. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C030

Grading Mode: Pass/No Pass

This course prepares students with the basic math principles and foundation for Elementary Algebra (MATH C010). The course content is equivalent to that covered separately in Basic Arithmetic (MATH C005) and Pre-Algebra (MATH C008). The course develops number and operation sense with regard to whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, mixed numbers, and decimals. Also included are grouping symbols, order of operations, estimation and approximation, scientific notation, ratios, percents, proportions, geometric figures, and units of measurement with conversions. An introduction to algebraic topics, including simple linear equations, algebraic expressions and formulas, and practical applications of the material are also covered. All topics will be covered without the use of a calculating device. Pass/No Pass. (NOT DEGREE APPLICABLE.)

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C044

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Numerical and algebraic operations, number systems, linear and quadratic equations/inequalities, exponents, polynomials, radicals, curve plotting, systems of equations/inequalities, nonlinear equations, logarithmic and exponential functions, complex numbers, and applications. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C045

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Statistics Pathway is recommended for majors that require no mathematics beyond college-level statistics, MATH C160. The course covers requisite topics from Algebra including linear equations and inequalities, linear regression analysis, exponential functions, exponential equations, descriptive statistics, probability, sampling distributions including the Normal distribution, and the use of graphing calculators and/or computer software. Please see a counselor for more information. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. (NOT DEGREE APPLICABLE.)

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C046

Grading Mode: Pass/No Pass, Standard Letter

This course covers the underlying algebra skills and concepts, along with mathematical problem solving and study skills that promote or are needed for success in College Algebra. Concurrent enrollment in specified sections of MATH C115 is required. Pass/No Pass or Graded. (NOT DEGREE APPLICABLE.)

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C091

Grading Mode: Pass/No Pass, Standard Letter

This course covers the underlying algebra skills and concepts, along with mathematical problem solving and study skills, that promote or are needed for success in Introduction to Statistics. Concurrent enrollment in specified sections of MATH C160 is required. Pass/No Pass or Graded. (NOT DEGREE APPLICABLE.)

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C096

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Examines the mathematics involved in personal finance, environmental issues, the social sciences, politics and voting, business and economics, graph theory, fractals, art, and music. The course will also include a writing and research component. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C100

Grading Mode: Standard Letter

This course is designed for prospective teachers. It is an activity-based exploration of statistics aligned with the California State Mathematics Standards for K-12. Topics include data representation and analysis, randomization, and sampling, measures of central tendency, and dispersion, hypothesizing, and statistical inference. Letter Grade only.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C103

Grading Mode: Standard Letter

This course will develop and reinforce conceptual understanding of mathematical topics through the use of connections, modeling, and representation and national and state curriculum standards for elementary school math, including Common Core State Standards. Instructional delivery design techniques and technological applications will be explored. The course involves using technology, participating in group work and projects, and observing and/or teaching in local elementary schools. Topics covered include whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, number theory, ratio, proportion, percent, set theory, and elementary logic. Letter Grade only. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C104 and MATH C105 combined: maximum credit, 1 course.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C104

Grading Mode: Standard Letter

This course will build fluency and understanding of basic mathematical concepts and develop reasoning, problem solving, and communicating skills. The course involves using technology, participating in group work and projects, and observing and/or teaching in local elementary schools. Topics covered include data analysis, probability, geometry, measurement, algebra, and coordinate geometry. Letter Grade only. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C104 and MATH C106 combined: maximum credit, 1 course.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C106

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Basic concepts of algebra, equations, and inequalities along with functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems, matrices and determinants, linear programming, conic sections, sequences, series, and combinatorics. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C115 and MATH C170 combined: maximum credit, 5-semester units.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C115

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Circular functions, trigonometric identities and graphs, inverse functions, triangles, vectors, applications, and imaginary and complex numbers. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C120

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

For Business, Management, and Social Science majors. Functions, graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of exponential and logarithmic functions, the Chain Rule, multivariable functions, differential equations, and applications. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C140 and MATH C180 combined: maximum credit, 1 course. C-ID: MATH 140.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C140

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

The Statway path is a two-semester sequence recommended for majors that require no mathematics beyond freshman-level statistics. MATH C146 is the second semester of the Statway sequence. MATH C146 includes topics from intermediate algebra (radical, exponential, and logarithmic algebraic phenomena) and inferential statistics. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C146 and MATH C160 combined: maximum credit, 1 course.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C146

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Topics include linear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance, sets and Venn diagrams, combinatorial techniques, and an introduction to probability. Applications in business, economics, and social sciences. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C150

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Statistical topics covered include collecting of data, sampling, probability, hypothesis testing, analyzing of variance, correlation and regression, nonparametric testing, and correlating for application in the natural sciences, social sciences, business, and management. Use of statistical technology will be introduced. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. C-ID: MATH 110.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C160

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Topics include algebra review, complex numbers, sequences and series, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric and inverse functions, vectors, analytic geometry, linear systems, matrices, elementary theory of equations, and polar coordinates. This course is designed for those students planning to study calculus. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C115 and MATH C170 combined: maximum credit, 5 semester units.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C170

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

This is the first course in the calculus sequence. It satisfies the requirement for majors in mathematics, science, or engineering. Topics include limits, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of derivatives, indefinite integrals, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of integration. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. UC Credit Limitations: MATH C140 and MATH C180 combined: maximum credit, 1 course. C-ID: MATH 210.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C180

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Second course in the calculus sequence. It satisfies the requirement for majors in mathematics, science, or engineering. Topics include techniques and applications of integration, calculus applied to parametric curves and polar curves, analytic geometry, sequences, series, and an introduction to differential equations. Graded or Pass/No Pass option.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C185

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Multivariable calculus including vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, calculus of vector fields, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. C-ID: MATH 230.

Catalog Program Pages Referencing MATH C280

Grading Mode: Standard Letter, Pass/No Pass

Introduction to linear algebra and differential equations, matrices, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, inverse and implicit function theorems, linear methods and numerical methods, Fourier series, and Laplace transforms. Graded or Pass/No Pass option. C-ID: MATH 910 S.


What do you say to students who find math challenging?

Most community college students have a fear of math. When encountering such students, I would say to them, “Nothing in life is to be feared it is only be understood.” Moreover, I use real-world examples to solve the problems to help them understand their respective subjects.

Learning math can be a frustrating experience. To those who want to quit the class, I always say to them, “You can do it. If you do your best, I will stand by you to see you make it.”


What are your thoughts on AB705?

I have been attending and speaking at, a variety of statewide conferences supporting the acceleration and placement of students. Along with my Co-Chair, Dr. Lisa Lee, I have been busy developing new support courses, collegiate courses, and new methods of placement to be compliant with AB 705. Research is proving that if we allow students to directly enroll in college-level courses many, many more students will pass. Not everyone. But the students who work hard, who persist despite initial struggles, who take advantage of support we have in place at Coastline, who put in the hours of work required, who form study groups, find tutors, etc., who are highly motivated, it turns out those students can and will succeed. Instead of being held back by remedial classes, the overall throughput of students who succeed will increase!


Whether you're running the office of a Fortune 500 or coding medical files, you've clicked into the heart of the business.You know education is the foundation of success and doesn't have to break the bank.

It&rsquos an influencer&rsquos world and you&rsquove got the connections to define it. Pursue a career in Journalism or PR. Become a business executive or HR manager. Coastline courses will keep you in the know.


Coastline College - Mathematics

College Commencements, Class of 2021

Coast District celebrates more than 13,000 degrees and certificates earned.

Board Meeting Information

Agendas and archives for the Coast District Board of Trustees.

Zoom Resources

What you need to know as we prepare for account transitions in June 2021.

The increased demand of personal protective equipment (PPE) have put thousands of requests on back order. In the effort to help protect medical professionals and our loved ones from COVID-19, Coastline College Biotechnology students, with the supervision of Dr. Tanya Hoerer, have established a goal to create protective masks and face shields for local clinics, first responders and hospitals. The funds will support the building materials, machinery, packaging and printing.

Social distance doesn't mean navigating college alone. Golden West College takes to Instagram Live every Thursday at 3 p.m. to answer student questions about online instruction, financial aid, and other student services. President McGrath and other leaders make regular visits to connect students with their college.

The Orange County Association for the Education of Young Children has named Orange Coast College's Early Childhood Lab School its Outstanding Program of the Year for 2020.
The Lab school will receive a certificate of recognition and conference registration for the 2021 OCAEYC Conference.


Coastline College - Mathematics

Develops arithmetic fluency and the conceptual basis, and applications of integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and measurements. A scientific calculator may be required. The TI-30XS or TI-30XIIS is recommended. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Credits

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Perform accurate arithmetic computations in a variety of expressions and applications.
  • Apply mathematical problem solving strategies.
  • Effectively communicate mathematical reasoning.

MTH 30 : Business Mathematics

Applies arithmetic to a variety of problems found in the business field, including simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation. Scientific calculator required.

This course is intended to prepare students to use basic mathematics in solving monetary problems in business and personal finance.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Analyze real world scenarios to recognize when simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation are appropriate, formulate problems about the scenarios, creatively model these scenarios (using technology if appropriate) in order to solve the problems using multiple approaches, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Appreciate business mathematics concepts that are encountered in the real world, understand and be able to communicate the underlying business concepts and mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into the situation.
  • Work with simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation problems in various situations and use correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to be prepared for future coursework in business and mathematics that requires the use of and an understanding of the concepts of business mathematics.

MTH 58 : Math Literacy I

Introduces pattern recognition, estimation and number sense, working with units, spreadsheets, linear equations and inequalities. Explores how to clearly communicate arguments supported by quantitative evidence using words, tables, graphs, and mathematical equations. Supports collaborative learning through class group interaction. TI-83 or TI-84 calculator required.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to

  • Make accurate inferences and conclusions based upon data presented in graphical or tabular format.
  • Demonstrate how units are used in measurement and in calculation.
  • Recognize linear and non-linear patterns.
  • Derive, solve, and model with linear equations and inequalities in one variable.
  • Estimate values based upon data presented in numerical, tabular and graphical form.

MTH 60 : Introductory Algebra - First Term

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on linear equations, linear inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

A scientific calculator and access to a graphing utility may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, and 112. Where physically possible, instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of proctored exams.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify the differences between an expression and an equation.
  • Simplify and evaluate algebraic expressions.
  • Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, and linear systems in two variables.
  • Identify and interpret the slope as a rate of change in linear relationships.
  • Create linear equations, inequalities, and systems that model contextual situations and use the model to make predictions.
  • Represent linear relationships between two variables using a graph, table, verbal description, and algebraic formula.

MTH 65 : Introductory Algebra - Second Term

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on polynomials, exponents, roots, geometry, dimensional analysis, solving quadratic equations, and graphing parabolas. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

A scientific calculator and access to a graphing utility may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, and 112. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of proctored exams.

Credits

Prerequisites

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Recognize and apply the operations necessary to simplify expressions and solve equations.
  • Perform polynomial addition, subtraction, and multiplication and perform polynomial division by a monomial.
  • Use exponent and radical properties to simplify expressions and solve radical and quadratic equations.
  • Distinguish among perimeter, area, and volume and apply the formulas and appropriate units in contextual situations.
  • Perform unit conversions.
  • Distinguish between quadratic and linear relationships in symbolic, graphical, and verbal forms.
  • Create quadratic models, make predictions, and interpret the meaning of intercepts, vertices, and maximum or minimum values.

MTH 66 : Introductory Algebra

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on polynomials, exponents, roots, geometry, dimensional analysis, solving quadratic equations, and graphing parabolas. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation. Lab time will be spent on activities that assist students in reviewing topics needed to be successful in the course.

Credits

  • Recognize and apply the operations necessary to simplify expressions and solve equations.
  • Perform polynomial addition, subtraction, and multiplication and perform polynomial division by a monomial.
  • Use exponent and radical properties to simplify expressions and solve radical and quadratic equations.
  • Solve systems of equations by graphing, substitution, and elimination and use systems in solving applications.

MTH 95 : Intermediate Algebra

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on factoring, functions, rational expressions, solving equations (quadratic, rational, radical, absolute value), and solving inequalities. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

Access to a graphing utility will be required and a scientific calculator may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, or 112. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of the proctored exams.

Credits

Prerequisites

Or placement into WR 115 also accepted. Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Factor expressions and use factoring to simplify rational expressions and solve quadratic equations.
  • Solve absolute value, quadratic, rational, radical equations, and compound inequalities both symbolically and graphically.
  • Understand the definition of a function and use it to distinguish between function and non-function relationships.
  • Interpret information provided in function notation given a function expressed in graphical, symbolic, numeric, or verbal form.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities, create a function to model a situation, and use algebra and/or technology to find and interpret a result.
  • Interpret properties of functions and relations, such as the meaning of ordered pairs, domain and range, maximum and minimum values, and intercepts.

MTH 98 : Math Literacy II

Introduces normal distribution and regression/curve fitting. Covers modeling, graphing and solving of linear and quadratic equations. Introduces problem solving with linear systems of equations. Explores how to clearly communicate sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence using spreadsheets, words, tables, graphs, and mathematical equations, as appropriate. Supports collaborative learning through class group interaction. TI-83 or TI-84 calculator required.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 58 or MTH 65 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to

Use a graphing calculator and an Excel style spreadsheet system to perform calculations and create graphical displays.

Make reasonable conclusions based upon data or situations modeled by a normal distribution.

Construct, model and problem solve with linear and non-linear functions.

Apply an understanding of functions and function notation.

Recognize the difference between direct and indirect variation.

MTH 105 : Math in Society

Explores concepts and applications of logic rules, basic probability and statistics as well as personal finance models. Investigates problem solving techniques (algebraic and nonalgebraic) as well as some nontraditional mathematics topics such as social choice or discrete mathematics. Integrates technology where appropriate.

It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Math in Society is a rigorous mathematics course designed for students in Liberal Arts and Humanities majors. The course provides a solid foundation in quantitative reasoning, symbolic reasoning, and problem solving techniques needed to be a productive, contributing citizen in the 21st century.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 95 or MTH 98 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use formulas and perform relevant calculations pertaining to personal finance in order to make informed financial decisions
  • Make and interpret calculations and graphical displays of numerical data in order to perceive and infer patterns within data sets
  • Calculate and interpret theoretical and empirical probabilities in support of making predictions and decisions in the presence of uncertainty
  • Use logical reasoning to describe and critique arguments and recognize common logical fallacies
  • Support conclusions using logical thought, reflection, explanation and justification
  • Use appropriate representations to effectively communicate, orally and in writing, quantitative results and mathematical processes

MTH 111 : College Algebra

Explores relations and functions graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally. Examines exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions. Investigates applications from a variety of perspectives. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in either MTH 95 or MTH 111. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of functions including function notation, function algebra, domain/range, inverse functions, piecewise functions, graph transformations, and symmetry.
  • Analyze polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions represented numerically, symbolically, verbally and graphically and identify properties of these functions using technology.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities create models solve exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational equations and interpret the results.
  • Demonstrate a mastery of the skills necessary for future course work that requires the use of college algebra concepts.

MTH 112 : Elementary Functions

Investigates trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Examines right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and complex numbers. Explores topics graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 112.

Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery-level understanding of angles and right triangle trigonometry in various systems of measure.
  • Analyze periodic functions and perform graph transformations on trigonometric functions.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities create models solve trigonometric equations and interpret the results.
  • Integrate pre-requisite skills to verify trigonometric identities and simplify trigonometric expressions.
  • Analyze the graphs of trigonometric functions, the graphs of functions defined on the polar coordinate system, the graphs of parametric equations, and complex numbers, using technology when appropriate.
  • Demonstrate mastery of skills necessary for future course work that requires an understanding of trigonometric functions and identities, vector arithmetic, complex numbers, the polar coordinate system, or parametric equations.

MTH 211 : Foundations of Elementary Math I

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model problem solving, numeration systems, operations, patterns and change, and number theory. Emphasizes quantitative and algebraic reasoning. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of the theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on numeration systems and operations as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and algebraic reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 212 : Foundations of Elementary Math II

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model operations with rational numbers including fractions, decimals, percents, and integers. Explores the set of irrational numbers, the set of real numbers, proportional reasoning, and simple probability and statistics. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of the theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on real number operations, probability, and statistics as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and statistical reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 213 : Foundations of Elementary Math III

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model problem solving, explore patterns and relationships among geometric figures and develop spatial reasoning. Explores informal geometry, transformational geometry, and measurement systems. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on geometric principles as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and geometrical reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 243 : Statistics I

Introduces displaying data with graphs, numerical descriptions of data, producing data, elementary probability, probability distributions, confidence intervals and significance testing. Investigates applications from science, business, and social science perspectives. Graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs and/or computer software required see instructor.

This is the first term of a two-term sequence (MTH 243 and 244) that is intended to provide an introduction to statistics in a data-based setting.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH98 or higher also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify statistical results and terminology in politics, popular culture, and scientific studies and state their relevance.
  • Use statistical thinking to identify, answer and interpret meaningful questions.
  • Generate appropriate graphical and numerical summaries for various situations.
  • Describe and identify the role and importance of variability and randomness in statistics.
  • Use statistical models (single and multivariable) and statistical inference (hypothesis testing and confidence intervals) in a range of contextual settings and draw appropriate conclusions.
  • Use statistical software to analyze data, carry out inference and make conclusions.
  • Be prepared to continue a course of study in a major field that requires the use and understanding of the concepts and logical implications of probability and statistics.

MTH 244 : Statistics II

Includes confidence interval estimation tests of significance including z-tests, t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square and inference for linear regression. Investigates applications from science, business, and social science perspectives. Graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs and/or computer software required see instructor.

This is the second term of a two-term sequence (MTH 243 and MTH 244). This course is intended to provide an introduction to statistics in a data-based setting.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Critically analyze the data from observational studies, surveys, and experiments, and using appropriate statistical methods and technology, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Interpret studies in scholarly and scientific publications and make sense of statistical information provided by the media.
  • Understand and be able to communicate the underlying mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into probability and statistics concepts encountered in real world situations.
  • Reason from data and use standard mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to engage in work, study, and other applications that require the use of and an understanding of the concepts of statistics in a data-based setting.

MTH 251 : Calculus I

Includes limits, continuity, derivatives and some applications of derivatives. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost.

This is the first course of four courses in the Calculus sequence. Lab time shall be used by students to work on group activities.

Effective Spring 2018, students will no longer be required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 251. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Analyze real world scenarios to recognize when derivatives and limits are appropriate, formulate problems about the scenarios, creatively model these scenarios (using technology, if appropriate) in order to solve the problems using multiple approaches, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Recognize derivatives and limit-related concepts that are encountered in the real world understand and be able to communicate the underlying mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into the situation.
  • Work with derivatives and limits in various situations and use correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to engage in work, study, and conversation on topics involving derivatives and limits with colleagues in the field of mathematics, science or engineering.

MTH 252 : Calculus II

Includes antiderivatives, the definite integral, topics of integration, improper integrals, and applications of differentiation and integration. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost.

This class is a foundational course for many STEM majors. Some topics are of particular importance for students continuing into MTH 253 including: using L’Hospital’s rule to evaluate limits, improper integrals, and error estimates for definite integrals. Students may be taking this course concurrently with calculus based physics courses. It can be beneficial for these students if the integral symbol is introduced early on to represent anti-derivatives. Partial fractions are a particularly important technique for engineering students (which will be revisited in MTH 253 and MTH 256). Students should be able to do simple partial fraction expansions by hand, but may use the “expand” command on their CAS for more complicated problems. Because this course is also a pre-requisite for MTH 261, logic and correct application of theorems should be emphasized.

Lab time shall be used by students to work on group activities.

Effective Summer 2018, students will no longer be required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 252. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.


Best Mathematics and Science colleges in the U.S.

As a child, you were more excited for science fair than recess. Now as an adult, when you watch The Big Bang Theory, you actually know what they’re talking about. Science is your thing, and you’re hoping that passion can take your career to the next level.

What mathematics and science degree options exist?

The number of science related jobs is increasing faster than the national average,* but so is the attention. Interests in the sciences has seen a 19% increase from female students and an 11% increase from male students*. Careers in the science field also have the largest salary range of any field, spanning from $33,000-$104,000*, leaving much to consider when choosing your path.

You’ve got the smarts and the know-how, and you’re on the right path. How it works, what it’s made of, and how can I fix it are common thoughts that run through your mind. Turn those thoughts into money with a career in science.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics
*Cambridge Occupational Analysts

Best Mathematics and Science colleges in the U.S. for 2021

University of California-Los Angeles offers 100 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a large city. In 2019, 3,062 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 2,378 Bachelor's degrees, 416 Master's degrees, and 268 Doctoral degrees.

Columbia University in the City of New York offers 112 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, private not-for-profit, four-year university in a large city. In 2019, 2,046 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,497 Master's degrees, 370 Bachelor's degrees, and 179 Doctoral degrees.

University of Washington-Seattle Campus offers 98 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a large city. In 2019, 2,977 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 2,469 Bachelor's degrees, 260 Doctoral degrees, and 248 Master's degrees.

How has the genetic makeup of human beings advanced over time? How does brain circuitry influence people’s aggressive behavior? Students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison can answer questions like these when they enroll in the school’s biology program, which allows them to concentrate on evolutionary or neurobiology. But the study of biology in this program does not end with Homo sapiens. Students with a green thumb may choose to focus their studies on plant biology, where they learn the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of plants. To augment their work in the classroom, students can participate in bioscience programs sponsored by the BioCommons—an educational innovation center housed in Steenbock Library that promotes networking with professors, participating in collaborative projects, and attending installments of a bioscience lecture series. And for the budding scientist who wants to bring work home, Madison has the BioHouse Learning Community, a residence hall where bioscience majors can live among students who share their same interests, challenges, and goals.

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor offers 86 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a midsize city. In 2019, 2,025 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,126 Bachelor's degrees, 592 Master's degrees, 282 Doctoral degrees, and 25 Certificates.

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities offers 93 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a large city. In 2019, 2,227 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,479 Bachelor's degrees, 529 Master's degrees, 215 Doctoral degrees, and 4 Certificates.

University of California-Berkeley offers 65 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a midsize city. In 2019, 2,148 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,666 Bachelor's degrees, 285 Doctoral degrees, and 197 Master's degrees.

Ohio State University-Main Campus offers 72 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a large city. In 2019, 1,992 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,469 Bachelor's degrees, 318 Master's degrees, and 205 Doctoral degrees.

Did you know that over half of all known near-earth asteroids and comets have been discovered by the University of Arizona? With its top-notch equipment (UA is the only university in the continental U.S. with its own radio telescope) and impressive staff (faculty member Roger Angel was a 2015 inductee into the National Inventors Hall of Fame), the sky’s the limit for students who want to make a mark on the universe. More than two-thirds of graduates of the highly selective Ph.D. program go on to long-term or permanent employment in astronomy. Astronomy undergrads receive a strong foundation in physics and math. Most work directly with faculty on research, perhaps studying the distribution of biological material in space or measuring the dimming of a star. The department also strives to educate anyone interested in the discipline and boasts one of the nation’s largest enrollments in astronomy for non-science majors. Any description of UA’s astronomy program would be lacking without mention of the Steward Observatory, which has played a key role in major space astronomy missions. (Ever heard of the Hubble Space Telescope?) Its original dome is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. But you’ll never guess where Steward’s cutting-edge mirror lab is located – under the east side of Arizona Stadium!

University of California-Davis offers 95 Mathematics and Science degree programs. It's a very large, public, four-year university in a small suburb. In 2019, 2,342 Mathematics and Science students graduated with students earning 1,935 Bachelor's degrees, 210 Doctoral degrees, and 197 Master's degrees.


Watch the video: Math 180 Calculus - Coastline College (November 2021).